Free Coaching Consultation

What is embodiment and why is it important?

Written on March 15, 2014 at 1:05 pm

Integral coaching emphasises embodiment in clients so that when the coaching program is completed the client goes out to the world “in a new body”, i.e. in a new way. If that is the case, change will be long-lasting, as opposed to having a lot of mental and cognitive change through the coaching, but no embodiment of the new way of being.

Embodiment refers to a type of long-lasting “memory” that our bodies carry. In a way one could say that who you are is “how your body is” and that’s why “wherever you go, there you are”. This because by learning and understanding about someone’s behaviour we can understand what level of embodiment that person has. So, do you walk your talk? If you don’t it’s because there must be some discrepancy between your level of cognition (ability to take perspectives, mental reasoning), and your behaviour.

Often we can see our behavioural patterns in a conscious manner and have the sense that we are “observing” ourselves doing things that we have been trying to alter for a long time. This means that there is some level of awareness, especially in the mental realm of our being, but very little or no awareness of how our bodies are responding to these behavioural patterns. By prescribing practices on a regular basis to my clients (and that are highly specific for each), I ensure that the “interior” muscles that are needed to support the emergence and sustainment of the new way are being worked. As opposed to only have the mental (also interior) “muscles” working, which are important but are not all that there is. In fact they are part of a much larger whole with other nuances and dimensions that are beside the purpose of this article. Importantly, it is the interior muscles that we possess (we don’t only possess physiological and observable muscles to the outside) that are fundamental for inner growth. In sports, when these interior muscles are integrated into the performance, technical, tactical and biomechanical aspects of training, a beautiful combination happens and the athlete is suddenly equipped with a more solid base to reach his/her potential; the same is true with my business and life coaching clients.

As the coaching progresses through the months I have seen how my clients arrive to the sessions in a “new body”; this is not only amazing, it is beautiful. Beautiful because this human being is growing in a way that becomes so obvious to me (and to him/her) that brings joy and light to myself, to him/her and to the whole coaching process.

Integral coaching emphasises embodiment in clients so that when the coaching program is completed the client goes out to the world “in a new body”, i.e. in a new way. If that is the case, change will be long-lasting, as opposed to having a lot of mental and cognitive change through the coaching, but no embodiment of the new way of being.

Often we can see our behavioural patterns in a conscious manner and have the sense that we are “observing” ourselves doing things that we have been trying to alter for a long time. This means that there is some level of awareness, especially in the mental realm of our being, but very little or no awareness of how our bodies are responding to these behavioural patterns. By prescribing practices on a regular basis to my clients (and that are highly specific for each), I ensure that the “interior” muscles that are needed to support the emergence and sustainment of the new way are being worked. As opposed to only have the mental (also interior) “muscles” working, which are important but are not all that there is. In fact they are part of a much larger whole with other nuances and dimensions that are beside the purpose of this article.

As the coaching progresses through the months I have seen how my clients arrive to the sessions in a “new body”; this is not only amazing, it is beautiful. Beautiful because this human being is growing in a way that becomes so obvious to me (and to him/her) that brings joy and light to myself, him/her and the whole coaching process.

Go Back